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advanced brewing techniques


This resource section will be devoted to advanced brewing techniques for both beer brewing and winemaking... as always, if you have any questions, ask the experts!



instructions for liquid yeast starter for wyeast

  • Break inner bulb in yeast packet and shake well. This may be accomplished using the instructions on the yeast packet or by gently popping bulb against the edge of a countertop or table. This allows the yeast to reach the sterile wort inside the packet and begin to feed.

  • Allow 1 day for every month since your yeast was packaged for your yeast packet to swell. When the packet is swollen to at least 1" tall (preferably 1-1/2"), brew your batch of starter DME (3 ounces DME to 1 quart .of water). Boil starter for 10-15 minutes, cover and cool to 70-75deg C.

  • Add to sanitized starter bottle (1/2 gallon jug, flask or similar).

  • Sanitize the outside of the yeast packet and a pair of scissors and cut the corner from the packet.

  • Pour contents into your starter bottle and cover with airlock and stopper or aluminum foil.

  • When starter has a head of foam, you are ready to pitch - approximately 1 day later.

  • You may also brew a larger amount of starter at this point and divide your original starter among more containers for additional batches of starter..
 
 



instructions for liquid yeast starter for whitelabs

  • Set the tube of Whitelabs at ambient temperature and let it slowly warm up over 2 hours or so.

  • While the tube is warming up, brew your batch of starter DME (3 ounces DME to 1 quart .of water). Boil starter for 10-15 minutes, cover and cool to 70-75deg C.

  • Add to sanitized starter bottle (1/2 gallon jug, flask or similar).

  • Sanitize the outside of the tube of yeast.

  • Pour contents into your starter bottle and cover with airlock and stopper or aluminum foil.

  • When starter has a head of foam, you are ready to pitch - approximately 4 to 6 hours later.

  • You may also brew a larger amount of starter at this point and divide your original starter among more containers for additional batches of starter.

 
 



instructions for all-grain brewing


  • Heat (or cool) the ten gallons of water to 170-175 deg F. Transfer 1 quart of water for every pound of grain into your mash tun. When the temperature equalizes, the water in the mash tun should be 160-165 deg F. You should adjust your temperature with the addition of a small amount of hot or cold water prior to doughing in (adding the grains). You may wish to adjust pH by simply adding gypsum to your mash water (pH should be 5.0 to 5.5 - the grains will help acidify the mash at this stage).

  • When you reach your target temperature, slowly stir in the grains (making sure there are no dry spots) When you have thoroughly mixed the grains and water, verify the mash is at 150-155 (F. Cover the mash tun and allow to rest for 90 minutes. You may verify conversion with an iodine test, however simply tasting for sweetness is sufficient.

  • As you reach the end of the mash rest, fill your sparge vessel with 170-175 deg F. water, attach the sparge arm, and mount it on top of the mash tun. (All valves closed). Open the valve(s) on the outlet of your mash tun and drain some of your sweet wort into a small saucepan (while making sure not to expose the grain bed - you may need to open the sparge vessel valve to do this). Recirculate the sweet wort by pouring over a spoon or saucer into the grain bedÖthis will avoid disturbing the grain bed and avoid splashing.

  • When the sweet wort runs clear, begin sparging. Your sparge water should be at a pH of 5.5 to 6.0 (You will most likely need lactic acid to achieve this - use very sparingly!). Sparging leaches the fermentable sugars by replacing the sweet wort with water to avoid collapsing the grain bed. This will require some fine-tuning to match inlet and outlet flows - observe levels frequently to match flows.

  • Continue sparging until you have 6 to 6.5 gallons of wort in your boiling kettle. Then brew as per your recipe instructions.
 
Some equipment to consider:
1000 mL Erlenmeyer Flask

Perfect for yeast culturing. This flask has a large opening, making it more convenient to use. A # 8 stopper fits the opening for use with an airlock.Can be used on an open flame.


Immersion Wort Chiller - Helical

The old stand-by helical (vertical) coil chiller. requires stirring to ensure quicker cooling.